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    Discuss Water Issues in Waterloo Region
    www.kitchener.ca/stormwatercredit
    www.waterloo.ca/stormwater


  2. #1
  3. Urbanomicon's Avatar
    From Kitchener, Ontario | Member Since Feb 2010 | 981 Posts
    #2

    Water Supply

    Breslau homeowners face massive hook-up costs
    February 19, 2010 | By Kevin Swayze, Record staff

    BRESLAU — Joe Blaskavitch says he and his neighbours can’t afford tens of thousands of dollars — each — to hook their homes into the Woolwich Township water and sewer system.
    He lives on Dolman Street in the heart of the old village of Breslau, where wells started going dry in 2007. Area residents blame housing development around the village. A township investigation blamed drought-like conditions that year, not development, for problems with the shallow wells.
    After a year of study, the township has a plan to hook 186 existing houses into urban services at the same time water and sewer pipes are installed to the 475-home Riverland subdivision along the Grand River.

    There are 90 homes in Breslau like Blaskavitch’s with private septic systems and wells. It would cost $92,222 for each homeowner to hook into the new pipes, decommission their wells and septic beds, pay off a township loan covering most of the costs, and pay water/sewer fees over the next 20 years.

    Another 96 homes to the south in the “Elroy Acres” already have public water connections but no sewer service. The 20-year cost for new sewer connections there is $53,145.
    “The local residents are worried crazy about losing their homes due to the high cost of the hookup,” Blaskavitch said.
    “Everybody is worried sick about this because there’s nobody in hell who can afford $92,000.”

    A township survey heard from three-quarters of residents in old Breslau. Two-thirds of respondents rejected hooking into public pipes.
    A staff recommendation to hook all homes to public water and sewer services goes to township council Feb. 23. The public meeting starts at 7 p.m. in council chambers, 24 Church St. W., in Elmira.

    Public water and sewer systems are the safest option for residents, a township study stays.

    “It’s certainty of supply of water and certainty of quality of water,” said Dan Kennaley, township engineering director.

    A public sewer system would protect nearby Waterloo Region water supply wells from contamination if private systems fail, Kennaley said. The new water mains would also bring fire hydrants to the oldest part of Breslau, likely reducing fire insurance rates for homeowners, he said.

    Most private septic systems are 30 years old and due for replacement to tough new standards. That could cost property owners $10,000 to $25,000, a township report says. A new, 30-metre drilled well would cost $12,500 to $20,000.

    In total, hooking up existing Breslau homes to water and sewer pipes would cost about $11 million. Doing it now allows $700,000 of road, water and sewer works already tied to subdivision construction used toward the overall project cost, Kennaley said.

    If council decides against forcing the public sewer system on Breslau residents now, they may have trouble hooking into it in future.

    Already approved subdivisions have sewage capacity allocated to them. Kennaley said developers “will be lining up” to use the unused capacity to build 200 more new homes around Breslau.
    http://news.therecord.com/News/Local/article/672849
    "Only the insane have the strength enough to prosper. Only those that prosper may truly judge what is sane."
  4. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #3
    Proposal would add $50 to cost of tap water
    Paying full monthly cost of resource would boost conservation, MPP says
    Rob Ferguson, Queen's Park Bureau
    http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/...t-of-tap-water


    A sign on a fountain warns people not to drink the water at the hospital in Walkerton, Ont., on May 24, 2000.

    Ontarians are willing to fork over cash for bottled water, but will they pay about $50 more a month for H{-2}O from the tap if quality improves?

    With the 10th anniversary of the deadly Walkerton water tragedy coming in May, that's the question raised in a private member's bill by Liberal MPP David Caplan.

    He proposes a major revamping of Ontario's water system so that residents pay the full cost of every glass drunk and every toilet flushed through new local or regional water utilities tasked with the job.

    Seven people died and about 2,500 others fell ill when the water supply of Walkerton, Ont., became contaminated with E. coli from manure spread on a nearby farm in May 2000.

    Caplan, a former health and infrastructure minister, estimates the monthly drain of his plan on family finances would be similar to the price of high-speed Internet, about $50.

    "That's one of the challenges," he acknowledged Thursday after Bill 237 passed another hurdle in the Legislature with a second reading vote that sends it to a committee of MPPs for further study.

    Both opposition parties voted against the bill with New Democrat MPP Peter Tabuns warning it is "largely redundant, costly and unwarranted," although Tory MPP Garfield Dunlop urged legislators to "keep an open mind."

    Caplan's idea is to promote conservation of a scarce resource by metering water usage in all homes, charging the actual cost of producing clean water and treating waste water while putting the proceeds into upgrading an aging provincial water system prone to leaks and breaks. The average leakage rate is 25 per cent of water flowing through pipes.

    "We have to do something," said Dunlop (Simcoe North).

    Some pipes in cities like Toronto and Ottawa are more than 100 years old. Toronto alone has 1,500 water main breaks a year, raising issues of wastage and contamination.

    That does not bode well for water quality in the future, said Caplan.

    While private members' bills rarely become law, Caplan said he's hoping the government will at least pick up on his idea.
  5. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #4
    SUBJECT: PROMOTING AND SUPPORTING THE USE OF MUNICIPAL TAP WATER AT PUBLIC EVENTS IN THE REGION
    Report: E-10-021 http://region.waterloo.on.ca/web/reg...df?openelement
    REGION OF WATERLOO TRANSPORTATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES
    Water Services
    TO: Chair Jim Wideman and Members of the Planning and Works Committee
    DATE: February 16, 2010

    RECOMMENDATION:

    THAT the Regional Municipality of Waterloo endorse formation of the Municipal Tap Water Providers, a group to promote municipal tap water in Waterloo Region;

    THAT Water Services staff be directed to sole-source purchase a water trailer from Kewl Earth of Stratford, Ontario at an upset cost of $56,800 plus taxes;

    AND THAT the water trailer be used to provide tap water at municipal events in Waterloo Region, all as outlined in report E-10-021, dated February 16, 2010.

    SUMMARY:

    In response to Regional Council’s direction to develop a program to support the benefits of using municipal tap water, Water Services staff are proposing to partner with several area municipalities and utilities and purchase a water trailer to provide tap water at public events. The Municipal Tap Water Providers will promote tap water as a safe, cost-effective, convenient, and environmentally-friendly choice and will enable greater reach into the community at less cost to each organization. Promotion of municipal water at municipally-organized events will be enhanced with the purchase of a portable water trailer to provide tap water to the participants. The trailer would be owned by the Region and licensed to individual municipalities that are running events where municipal water is not normally available. The Municipal Tap Water Providers would help coordinate the events at which the trailer would be used during its test year of 2010 and full-scale use in 2011.


    Planning and Works Committee - February 16, 2010 Minutes
    http://region.waterloo.on.ca/web/reg...0!OpenDocument

    f) E-10-021 Promoting and Supporting the Use of Municipal Tap Water at Public Events in the Region

    MOVED by J. Mitchell
    SECONDED by B. Strauss

    THAT the Regional Municipality of Waterloo endorse formation of the Municipal Tap Water Providers, a group to promote municipal tap water in Waterloo Region;

    THAT Water Services staff be directed to sole-source purchase a water trailer from Kewl Earth of Stratford, Ontario at an upset cost of $56,800 plus taxes;

    AND THAT the water trailer be used to provide tap water at municipal events in Waterloo Region, all as outlined in report E-10-021, dated February 16, 2010.

    CARRIED
  6. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #5
    Woolwich to monitor options for Breslau water services
    March 5, 2010 By: Steve Kannon
    http://observerxtra.com/2/news/woolw...ater-services/

    The do-nothing approach still stands in Breslau, but Woolwich will keep an eye out for opportunities to provide water services to the village at a lower cost, should residents some day decide that’s the way to go.

    Tuesday night, councillors discussed the decision made at last week’s committee-of-the-whole meeting, opting to formally adopt the recommendation to drop servicing plans in the wake of strong public opposition.

    Residents balked at forecasted costs of some $92,000 apiece to extend water and sanitary sewers to the older parts of the village. About a hundred of them turned out last week to argue against the idea.

    However, Coun. Sandy Shantz, who chaired last week’s meeting, expressed concerns about safety and water quality, calling on staff to keep an eye out for federal or provincial government funding that might help bring municipal services to the community.

    That, in turn, led to a debate over how much the township should do, with Coun. Ruby Weber noting that a longstanding policy dictates homeowners pay the full cost of servicing rather than the municipality picking up any of the costs.

    Complicating matters somewhat are plans for an extension of water lines required to loop the system that now extends to the new subdivisions in Breslau. Some of the homeowners now using private wells and septic systems could have the opportunity to connect to the new pipes when they’re eventually installed.

    That would, however, present the township with something of a dilemma when it comes to billing those homeowners: does it charge only the cost, or the full amount estimated in a consultant’s report, approximately $15,000 for water services? asked director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley.

    He noted that allowing some homeowners to tie into the looped line at a much lower cost would mean the remaining property owners would face even higher costs should they opt for municipal services down the road, as the much more expensive project to extend services would be shared by a smaller number of people.

    Seeming to side with the idea of seeking grants to help offset costs, Coun. Murray Martin argued residents in the older part of the village should pay no more than what homeowners in Elroy Acres paid for a 2003 project to replace a privately-owned communal well system, about $15,000 each.

    “I’ve always favoured that.”
  7. #6
    This happened to the residents in Plattsville last summer. They had to re-do the water system and every house was billed 10-15k. The only people who didn't have to pay was the newer sub-divion that was built in the early 90's because it was done when they built it. Although you don't have to pay the fee all at once it does hinder you when you sell and there is a outstanding debt that most people won't pay if they bought your house.
  8. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #7
    WASTEWATER OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE CONTRACT – PROPOSED TERMS AND CONDITIONS
    REGION OF WATERLOO TRANSPORTATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES: Water Services
    TO: Chair Jim Wideman and Members of the Planning and Works Committee
    DATE: April 27, 2010
    Report: E-10-054

    RECOMMENDATION: THAT the Regional Municipality of Waterloo enter into a contract with the Ontario Clean Water Agency (“OCWA”) for the continued management of the wastewater treatment facilities with the Region of Waterloo for a period of five years as detailed in Report E-10-054; AND THAT the Regional Chair and Regional Clerk be authorized to execute an agreement with OCWA satisfactory to the Commissioner, Transportation and Environmental Services and the Regional Solicitor to implement the above recommendations.

    REPORT:

    Background
    The Region of Waterloo is in the final year of a service agreement with the Ontario Clean Water Agency (OCWA) to operate and maintain the Region’s wastewater treatment facilities. To establish a new service arrangement for 2011, a review of different service delivery models was conducted in 2009. The recommendation from this review (detailed in E-09-109), and the direction from Council, was to continue with OCWA for the provision of operation and maintenance services, and to initiate negotiations with OCWA for these services, reporting back to Council with the results of the negotiations.
    ...
    OCWA Services
    OCWA is a crown agency of the province of Ontario with a mandate to provide safe and reliable water and wastewater services. According to a 2006 survey on 1,080 municipal water and wastewater systems, OCWA provides operating services to approximately 42% of these systems with the remaining 54% operated by municipalities and 4% by other arrangements. OCWA has the largest share of the contract operating service market in Ontario. As a company wholly owned by the Province of Ontario, OCWA meets Canadian investment priorities and provisions. OCWA brings to the Region continuity of service, stability, and quality of service with a long history of compliance. OCWA also carries an Essential Services provision and as such would be responsible for all costs associated with any labour disruption. OCWA offers the Region a low risk and low cost transition to a new service agreement. They bring competitive prices to their clients as they are backed financially by the province (no bonding requirement) and economies of scale for purchasing power for commodities.
    ...
    Service Agreement
    Under the existing Service Agreement (2006-2010), OCWA is responsible for the day-to-day operations and maintenance of the 13 wastewater treatment facilities, 5 pumping stations and 2 collection systems. The scope of this responsibility includes wastewater effluent quality, compliance with legislation, site security, asset protection, insurance coverage, regulatory reporting, and the procurement and administration of chemicals. In addition, maintenance of the Region’s facilities and equipment is performed based on principles that support asset protection and routine maintenance activities.
    ...
    FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:
    Based on the negotiations, OCWA has submitted a final proposal to the Region for operation and maintenance services in 2011 of $6,923,953. Certain items such as chemicals are subject to an annual market adjustment and the balance is subject to annual inflation. To effectively compare OCWA’s bid proposal, one must separate the new provisions in 2011 from the original agreement and current operations. The table below presents the estimated 2010 operating costs and compares these to the proposal.
    Estimated 2010 Operating Costs $6,401,802
    OCWA’s Proposal 2011 $6,923,953
    New Contract Provisions $522,151
    The additional provisions that have been included in the new OCWA proposal have resulted in increases in operational and maintenance costs. These additional services will ultimately improve the effluent quality discharged to the Grand River as the new contract will impose more stringent treatment targets on OCWA and improvements in treatment. Expanded and improved maintenance levels will also ensure that the Region’s existing and newly constructed infrastructure will be maintained and protected to a higher standard. As noted above, the Region of Waterloo retained the services of Deloitte & Touche to validate the process used to conduct negotiations with OCWA and to provide an objective third party assessment of the financial components of the contract proposed by OCWA. Deloitte & Touche have concurred with the opinion of Regional staff that the process is consistent with the provisions of the Region’s Procurement By-law. Operating budget increases were anticipated with a new operating contract and provisions for these were included in the 2010 wastewater rate model forecast.
    ...
  9. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #8
    Region of Waterloo wins water efficiency award for public education on water conservation
    April 27, 2010 - http://www.region.waterloo.on.ca/web...B?OpenDocument

    KITCHENER, ON – The Region of Waterloo will be recognized as recipient of an Ontario Water and Wastewater Association (OWWA) Water Efficiency Award for Public Education and Awareness. This award is presented to organizations that have demonstrated a leadership role in promoting and educating the public on the importance of conserving precious drinking water resources.

    The Region of Waterloo won the award on the basis of their many initiatives designed to educate the public in good water efficiency practices. The demonstrated public awareness of, and participation in programs such as the Toilet Replacement Program, water efficient garden seminars, the rain barrel distribution, the Water Efficient Technology (W.E.T.) Program for businesses and the Water Conservation By-law were key elements. In addition, the Region’s strong school education program is the highlight of their education program, headlined by the innovative “Thrills and Spills” board game, which teaches positive water-related behaviours in a fun, unique format.

    “Thrills & Spills” is available as both a physical board game as well as an online game that takes you on a journey where positive and negative situations effecting how we manage and use our drinking water are encountered. “It’s great for the Region of Waterloo to be recognized for its efforts in promoting the importance of water management,” said Regional Chair Ken Seiling. “Our water education package acknowledges that children are our future stewards and it encourages learning in a fun environment, which gives them a better understanding and appreciation for the importance of conserving water.”

    The Region of Waterloo’s Water Services Division is responsible for the planning, monitoring, operation and maintenance of the Region’s water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. The water supply system includes numerous wells, water treatment plants, water storage and pumping facilities and large water transmission mains. The wastewater system includes 13 wastewater treatment plants and several wastewater pumping stations. To support its water supply and wastewater treatment functions, the Division develops and implements water efficiency, water resource protection and sewer use control programs. It also includes an analytical laboratory which analyses water, wastewater and other materials.

    The OWWA is a not-for-profit membership organization dedicated to the promotion of public health and welfare in the provision of drinking water of unquestionable quality and sufficient quantity.

    The Region of Waterloo will receive the award on May 4, 2010 at the OWWA Joint Conference and Trade Show in Windsor, Ontario.

    For more information, please contact: Dan Meagher, Supervisor, Source Water Protection Programs, DMeagher@regionofwaterloo.ca
  10. Urbanomicon's Avatar
    From Kitchener, Ontario | Member Since Feb 2010 | 981 Posts
    #9
    Storm water fees could double for homeowners
    May 04, 2010 | By Melinda Dalton, Record staff | http://news.therecord.com/News/Local/article/705894

    KITCHENER — The average homeowner will pay twice as much for storm water services under the city’s new rate system if councillors approve a fee structure recommended by city staff.

    The new storm water rate system, approved in principle by city councillors in January, will move storm water services out of the tax base and into its own separately billed utility like gas and hydro.

    The city is moving to the rate system to bring storm water management up to a “sustainable” level of service and pay for capital projects like cleaning the Victoria Park Lake and improving other elements of the system.

    Waterloo is also in the process of implementing a similar rate system to improve its service level.

    On Monday evening, Kitchener city staff and consultants presented an update on the storm water utility in a strategic planning session at city hall.

    The update included a draft fee rate schedule that showed how much each property owner would need to pay to bring the service level up to $13 million a year.

    Based on that schedule, the average single family household would save $5.85 a month on their property tax bill but pay $12.60 a month to the new storm water utility.

    Grant Murphy, the city’s director of engineering, acknowledged the shift to a rate system can be complex and difficult to decipher.

    “It’s going to be a bit of a challenge for the public and council to get their head around it,” he said. “But, I’m confident we’ll get there.”

    The $13-million annual cost for the utility detailed in the presentation is a $3-million jump over the figure staff presented to council when they approved increasing the service level in January.

    Most of that tab, $11.5 million, will be picked up by property owners who will receive a monthly bill for the service based on the size and type of their property.

    Murphy said the previous figure, taken from a 2008 feasibility study on the storm water management system, was based solely on “raw operational costs” and didn’t take into account things like administrative overhead and inflation. A portion of the new consolidated maintenance faculty will also be borne by the storm water maintenance utility.

    The increase isn’t an attempt to further expand the cost of the utility, Murphy said. It’s a more accurate representation of what the city is already spending.

    Some of the $13-million cost will be covered through an increase in funding from the federal gas tax.
    Some will also come from reallocating money from other city services that have in the past taken on some activities related to the storm water system.

    The rest will come from the tax roll, said Murphy.

    The $4.1-million increase to the service level already approved by council will remain unchanged, he said.

    The rate schedule presented Monday does not make a distinction between properties that were historically tax exempt, and therefore do not currently pay for storm water services, and other non-residential properties.

    City staff have been communicating with places of worship and the school boards about the new charges, but haven’t been in touch with other charities that might be impacted, the meeting heard. Only charities that own their building and are currently tax exempt would be affected.

    The majority of single-family homeowners in Kitchener would pay about $12 a month, based on the fee schedule recommended by staff. A small house would pay less, a large house more.
    Mutli-unit dwellings would pay per building based on the number of units.

    A non-residential property with a medium amount of hard surface areas, like Franklin Public School, would pay $607 a month. The city’s biggest commercial and industrial properties could be billed up to $1,500 a month.

    Some councillors expressed concern about a jump between the small and medium non-residential rates that could see a property owner with 8,167 square meters of impervious surface paying $25 a month, while another with only one square metre more paying nearly 20 times that.

    Murphy said details of the implementation plan are still being reviewed and some alternatives will be presented to council that separate out tiers for current tax exempt properties and others that include more tiers to eliminate dramatic jumps.

    He said staff are also looking at some type of crediting system that would reduce the fees for non-residential property owners who make an effort to reduce runoff on their properties.

    The full staff report on the storm water utility implementation will go to council on May 10. The rate system is expected to come into effect January 1, 2011.
    "Only the insane have the strength enough to prosper. Only those that prosper may truly judge what is sane."
  11. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #10
    KIT: STORMWATER RATE BY-LAW AND UTILITY IMPLEMENTATION
    Finance and Corporate Services Committee
    DATE OF REPORT: May 5, 2010 | DATE OF MEETING: May 10, 2010
    SUBMITTED BY: Grant Murphy, Director Engineering Services
    PREPARED BY: Grant Murphy, Director Engineering Services
    REPORT NO.: DTS-10-094

    RECOMMENDATION:
    1. That the ten (10) year capital and operating forecast for the stormwater management program be approved as outlined in staff report DTS-10-094 , subject to revision through the annual budget process;
    2. That the stormwater rate schedule as specified in Appendix B of staff report DTS-10-094 be approved and come into effect on January 1, 2011;
    3. That the by-law enacting the stormwater rate be approved as an amendment to the fees and charges by-law;
    4. That a reduction in the following base budgets be implemented as of fiscal 2011 resulting from a shift to a stormwater utility model:
    Tax supported operating budget of $6,204,228
    Water utility of $256,677
    Sanitary utility of $259,414
    Gas utility of $278,184
    Federal gas tax revenue of $1,908,000
    5. That staff provide a report related to a stormwater rate credit policy for Council’s consideration prior to January 1, 2013;
    6. That staff report to Council prior to January 1, 2013 on the viability of transitioning non-residential properties from the approved “tiered flat fee” stormwater rate structure to a method where these properties are charged according to their actual measured impervious area;
    7. That one (1) engineering manager position (full-time), one (1) operations supervisor (full-time), one (1) engineering project manager position (full-time), and one (1) revenue analyst position (full-time) be hired beginning in June 2010 so as to enable the implementation of the stormwater utility and advancing related stormwater projects and further;
    8. That $100,000 be transferred from the Grand River Erosion Control project (account numbers 11619 and 7367) and that $129,000 be transferred from the Victoria Park Lake Environmental Assessment project (account numbers 52000039 and 207) into the Stormwater Utility Implementation Plan (account number 701204027);

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:
    Staff are recommending that a stormwater rate structure be implemented on January 1, 2011. The rate methodology provides for a fair and equitable approach allocated costs associated with stormwater management to all property owners in the City of Kitchener. The funding would support the proposed 10 year capital and operating forecast for stormwater programming based on the concept of attaining a sustainable level of service. A rationalized fee structure has been developed and is presented for Council’s consideration, along with the enacting by-law for implementation of the stormwater rate starting on January 1, 2011.

    BACKGROUND:
    In November 2004, Council directed staff to proceed with undertaking a Stormwater Management Program and Funding Review Study (Study) collaboratively with the City of Waterloo as part of the Shared Services Initiative. The purpose was to identify the City’s current level of service, compare this to the legislated requirements and guidelines, develop a suggested level of service, and to evaluate appropriate funding mechanisms to support the stormwater program needs. The Study recommended that a utility structure and user rate approach be implemented in order to fully fund stormwater management programming within the City of Kitchener. Council approved the principle of shifting stormwater management programming from the tax base to a rate based approach on January 18, 2010 (DTS Report 10-016 and 10-023). As well, Council approved an annual sustainable level of service for stormwater management of $9,910,590 (2007) and directed staff to present additional information on a preferred rate methodology for their consideration. On February 8, 2010, Council approved the “tiered flat fee” stormwater rate model as the basis to charge property owners for stormwater programming. Council directed staff to present a stormwater rate and utility implementation plan and present recommendations for consideration on or before May 31, 2010.

    REPORT:
    ...
    Table 2 – Residential Stormwater Charges
    Type Code | Description | Basis for Charge | Number of Dwelling Units | Monthly Charge per Property | Annual Charge per Property | Number of Customers
    1 | Residential Single Detached Small | Detached homes with building footprint size of 105 m2 or less | 1 | $6.30 | $76 | 4,180
    2 | Residential Single Detached Medium | Detached homes with building footprint size between 106-236 m2 | 1 | $10.50 | $126 | 33,450
    3 | Residential Single Detached Large | Detached homes with building footprint size of 237 m2 or more | 1 | $13.80 | $166 | 4,180
    Notes:
    1. Monthly stormwater rate charge per property to generate $11.56M/yr. Federal gas tax revenue contribution is $1.44M/yr.
    Assumes 95% collection rate. All charges rounded to the nearest 30Ę.
    2. Approximate count as of May 5, 2010.

    ...
  12. RangersFan's Avatar
    From Kitchener | Member Since Jan 2010 | 1,579 Posts
    #11
    Politicians award $35M contract without bids
    May 10, 2010 | By Jeff Outhit, Record staff

    WATERLOO REGION — Regional council has approved a $35-million contract without competitive bidders and Coun. Sean Strickland is upset.

    The five-year contract will pay the Ontario Clean Water Agency to continue operating sewage treatment plants owned by regional government.

    Strickland argues council was wrong to negotiate only with its longtime operator for such a big-dollar deal. Other firms that operate sewage plants might have offered taxpayers a better deal had they been allowed to bid, he contends.

    “We’ll never know A, if we are really getting good value for $35 million, and B, if we could have got the same service for less money,” said Strickland, of Waterloo.

    Councillors chose not to seek outside bids because they feel they are getting good value from the provincial agency, they don’t want to spend up to $1 million on a lengthy assessment of competing bids, and they fear transition turmoil if they hire another firm while major sewer upgrades are underway. They also voted not to have regional employees operate sewage plants.

    Benchmarking reveals good sewage costs, Chair Ken Seiling said. An auditor who monitored negotiations concluded the deal is reasonable. Seiling is confident taxpayers are getting value for money.

    “That’s borne out by the comparison with other sewage operations across Ontario,” he said.

    Regional government, which is bigger than all city and township governments combined, commonly secures competitive bids for equipment and contracts. But council sometimes waives this process.

    That’s generally after bureaucrats cite special circumstances, such as a lack of suppliers, a lack of bids, a time crunch requiring a fast decision, or an advantage in continuing an existing technology.

    “They’re a very small number in a high number of tenders we issue,” Seiling said. “I think there are reasons when it happens legitimately,”

    For example, council did not secure competitive bids this year for:

    Two replacement truck scales at the Waterloo landfill, valued at $211,000. Politicians were told only one firm in Canada makes the scales sought by regional staff.

    A consulting contract to manage airport upgrades, valued at $383,000. The contract was negotiated with the firm that designed the upgrades. Strickland moved approval. “There is on occasion legitimate reasons why not to have competitive bids,” he said.

    A water trailer valued at $56,800. Politicians were told only one firm manufactures the specialized trailer, in Stratford. It will be used to promote tap water.

    Council last sought bids to operate sewage plants in 1997. The Ontario Clean Water Agency won the contract to continue the work it has been doing since it was part of the Ministry of the Environment prior to 1994.

    The latest sewage contract lasts through 2015. It’s worth at least $34.6 million and could increase due to inflation and other factors.
  13. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #12
    STORMWATER RATE BY-LAW AND UTILITY IMPLEMENTATION
    REPORT TO: Finance and Corporate Services Committee
    DATE OF REPORT: May 5, 2010 | DATE OF MEETING: May 10, 2010
    PREPARED & SUBMITTED BY: Grant Murphy, Director Engineering Services
    REPORT NO.: DTS-10-094


    STORMWATER RATE BY-LAW AND UTILITY IMPLEMENTATION - ADDENDUM TO DTS 10-094 REPORT
    REPORT TO: Finance and Corporate Services Committee
    DATE OF REPORT: May 12, 2010 | DATE OF MEETING: May 17, 2010
    PREPARED & SUBMITTED BY: Grant Murphy, Director Engineering Services
    REPORT NO.: DTS-10-100

    RECOMMENDATION:
    1. That the ten (10) year capital and operating forecast for the stormwater management program be approved as outlined in staff report DTS-10-094 , subject to revision through the annual budget process;
    2. That the stormwater rate schedule as specified in Appendix B of staff report DTS-10-094 be approved and come into effect on January 1, 2011;
    3. That the by-law enacting the stormwater rate be approved as an amendment to the fees and charges by-law;
    4. That a reduction in the following base budgets be implemented as of fiscal 2011 resulting from a shift to a stormwater utility model:
    Tax supported operating budget of $6,204,228
    Water utility of $256,677
    Sanitary utility of $259,414
    Gas utility of $278,184
    5. That City Staff meet with the Waterloo Region District School Board and the Waterloo Catholic District School Board in order to clarify the matter of a municipality's legal authority to apply storm water rates to the Boards' properties.
    6. That staff provide a report related to a stormwater rate credit policy for Council’s consideration prior to January 1, 2012;
    7. That one (1) engineering manager position (full-time), one (1) operations supervisor (full-time), one (1) engineering project manager position (full-time), and one (1) revenue analyst position (full-time) be hired beginning in June 2010 so as to enable the implementation of the stormwater utility and advancing related stormwater projects;
    8. That $100,000 be transferred from the Grand River Erosion Control project (account numbers 11619 and 7367) and that $129,000 be transferred from the Victoria Park Lake Environmental Assessment project (account numbers 52000039 and 207) into the Stormwater Utility Implementation Plan (account number 701204027) and further;
    9. That staff report to Council prior to January 1, 2013 on the viability of transitioning non-residential properties from the approved “tiered flat fee” stormwater rate structure to a method where these properties are charged according to their actual measured impervious area.

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY:
    On February 22nd, 2010, Council directed staff to present a stormwater rate and utility implementation plan for consideration on or before May 31, 2010DTS report 10-100 provides updated recommendations and additional information about DTS10-094 based on inquiries and concerns raised by public and members of the Financial and Corporate Services Committee on the May 10th 2010 related to the proposed stormwater rate structure and the implementation plan.

    BACKGROUND:
    In November 2004, Council directed staff to proceed with undertaking a Stormwater Management Program and Funding Review Study (Study) collaboratively with the City of Waterloo as part of the Shared Services Initiative. The purpose was to identify the City’s current level of service, compare this to the legislated requirements and guidelines, develop a suggested level of service, and to evaluate appropriate funding mechanisms to support the stormwater program needs. The Study recommended that a utility structure and user rate approach be implemented in order to fully fund stormwater management programming within the City of Kitchener.
    On February 22nd, 2010, Council directed staff to present a stormwater rate and utility implementation plan and present recommendations for consideration on or before May 31, 2010. DTS10-094 report recommends that a stormwater rate structure be implemented on January 1, 2011. The rate methodology provides for a fair and equitable approach allocating costs associated with stormwater management to all property owners in the City of Kitchener.
    The report provides details associated with the 10 year stormwater programming capital and operating forecast, the proposed rate structure and along with the enacting by-law for implementation of the stormwater rate starting on January 1, 2011. Also included in the report are recommendations relating to resource requirements for advancing stormwater programming in 2010, along with a summary of the consultation process with “places of worship”, the Waterloo Region District School Board and the Waterloo Catholic District School Board.
  14. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #13
    PowerPoint Presentation May 10, 2010
    Stormwater Rate By-law and Utility Implementation Report DTS10-094
    Presented to City of Kitchener Council | Financial and Corporate Services Committee
    K. Grant Murphy P.Eng. City Engineer | Mike Gregory P.Eng. (AECOM)
    http://www.kitchener.ca/Files/Item/i...esentation.pdf

  15. From Waterloo, ON | Member Since Jan 2010 | 2,288 Posts
    #14
    These stormwater user fees are lame not because they're user fees, but because they're user fees with no incentives to use less. They should be based on the gross area of impermeable surface on a property, with additional accounting for water-retention strategies. A property owner should be able to take their stormwater fees essentially to zero if they avoid the need to use the stormwater management system -- through permeable paving, bioswales, rain capture systems, etc.
  16. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #15
    City continues to investigate options for implementing new stormwater management funding
    Monday, May 17, 2010 | http://www.kitchener.ca/news/MediaDetail.asp?tid=19050

    KITCHENER - At a special meeting of the finance and corporate services committee this afternoon, Kitchener City Council continued the discussion regarding the stormwater management user-fee rate schedule and implementation plan tabled at last week's regularly scheduled meeting. The proposed fee schedule and implementation plan will ensure sustainable funding to cover the cost of stormwater management and environmental protection in the city.
    After hearing from a number of delegations, the committee has asked staff to come back to the June 7 finance and corporate services meeting with more information on several areas as follows:
    • That places of worship and charities be given grants of 100% indefinitely under the condition that any money that would have been spent to pay the stormwater rate be used for education purposes and on-site stormwater management activities.
    • That through the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) the city appeal to the province to address the issue of the conflicting legislation between the Municipal Act and the Education Act over the city's authority to charge the school boards for stormwater management. The committee suggested that the city not exempt the school boards but that payment for stormwater management is not expected until the issue is resolved.
    • That a credit system be put in place for non-residential properties for 2012 and be retroactive to January 1, 2011 when the stormwater rate comes into effect.
    • That staff investigate the opportunities for a residential credit system to be put in place for 2013.
    • That staff look at what impact reducing the recommended level of funding of $13M annually to $10M annually would have on both stormwater activities, capital projects as well as the proposed stormwater rates.
    • That staff consider a phased implementation over two or three years to implement both the increase in funding and the switch from the tax levy to a user fee.
    • That a fourth category for residential properties be investigated.

    The stormwater rate system was approved in principle by city council in January. The tiered flat fee rate schedule would see the cost of stormwater management transferred from tax-based funding to a fee that will be applied to residents' water bills beginning January 1, 2011. The stormwater rate will apply to all properties, including those that are tax-exempt.
    The new stormwater rate would mean that stormwater service would no longer be funded through property taxes, but instead becomes its own separately billed utility, like gas and hydro. The transfer to this new funding model will help address the infrastructure deficit and ensure a sustainable level of service that allows for greater flexibility and adaptability to address regulatory changes, climate change impacts, etc.
    ''The proposed rate means we can bring stormwater management up to a sustainable level of service to meet provincial and federal environmental regulations,'' says Grant Murphy, director of engineering for the City of Kitchener. ''It will also allow us to advance the clean-up of Victoria Park Lake to meet the community's expectations and make improvements to the stormwater management system.''
    The move to the funding model dedicates dollars specifically to stormwater management, which has been consistently underfunded through the tax base. While this approach to funding stormwater management program is a relatively new concept in Canada, it has been successfully implemented in hundreds of cities throughout North America.
    A series of rate tiers has been established calculated based on property type and size to account for the varying degrees different sized properties use the system.
    Properties with a high percentage of impervious surfaces -- like buildings, driveways and parking lots - typically create a lot of run-off because these surfaces do not allow water to absorb into the earth. As a result, industrial and commercial properties will pay higher rates than residential properties because they generally contribute more run-off and pollutants to the stormwater system.
    The rate was calculated to support the proposed 10-year capital and operating forecast for stormwater programming, based on attaining a sustainable level of service that meets environmental regulations.

    Background
    Stormwater management involves controlling the quantity and quality of runoff resulting from rainfall or snowmelt events. The city's stormwater management system includes storm sewers, watercourses, drains/ditches, culverts, bridges, swales, catch basins, inlets, outfalls, ponds and other water quality treatment devices.
    Maintaining existing facilities is a large part of the stormwater budget. This vital task includes street cleaning; inspection and maintenance of ponds; inspection, cleaning, and repair of catchbasins, manholes, pipes, outfalls, ditches, channels, culverts; and other activities across Kitchener.
  17. UrbanWaterloo's Avatar
    From Kitchener-Waterloo | Member Since Dec 2009 | 5,693 Posts
    #16
    2010 WATER AND WASTEWATER MONITORING REPORT
    REGION OF WATERLOO TRANSPORTATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES: Water Services
    PLANNING, HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES: Community Planning
    TO: Chair Jim Wideman and Members of the Planning and Works Committee
    DATE: May 18, 2010 | Report: E-10-048/P-10-038

    RECOMMENDATION:
    THAT the Regional Municipality of Waterloo accept the 2010 Water and Wastewater Monitoring Report summarized in Report E-10-048/P-10-038 as the account of water supply and wastewater treatment capacity as of December 31, 2009;
    AND THAT capacity be formally reserved for the new Boxwood Employment Lands as requested by Cambridge Council and as described in Report E-10-048/P-10-038, dated May 18, 2010.

    SUMMARY:
    The 2010 Water and Wastewater Monitoring Report (2010 WWWMR) outlines the ability of the Regional water supply and wastewater treatment facilities to accommodate the current, short to medium term demands to 2021. The full report is available on the Region’s Water Services website and at the Water Services administration office. A draft of the report was previously distributed to all Area Municipalities for review. Regional staff has reviewed all issues raised by the affected Area Municipal staff and are unaware of any remaining outstanding concerns. Firm or system water supply capacities were adequate to meet actual maximum demands in all communities supplied by a Regional system in 2009. Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) capacities were sufficient at all Regional plants to treat actual average flows in 2009. Firm or system water supply and wastewater capacities in 2021 are based on the implementation of works from the Region's current capital program; the10-year and longer term (2021) forecasts for water and wastewater capacities are anticipated to be adequate to accommodate all current development commitments. Through the Water and Wastewater Master Plans, the water and wastewater capacities are planned for the next thirty years based on the “Places to Grow” forecasts for population and employment. The allocation of remaining capacity to new development is determined by Region of Waterloo staff in cooperation with the Local Area Municipalities. Prior to the registration of a plan of subdivision has traditionally been the point at which the capacity of water and wastewater systems is committed to new subdivisions in accordance with Ministry of the Environment policies. However, since 2004, an increasing portion of all residential development has occurred outside of plans of subdivision. This includes development on previously existing lots of record both within the built up areas and within the greenfield areas. These units are typically townhouse or apartment units and are often registered as plans of condominium. This number is expected to increase, particularly in the City of Waterloo in the short term, as there is little remaining designated greenfield area and a large number of applications for site plans and plans of condominiums already in process. With the adoption of the Places to Grow: Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Municipalities are now required to provide for a minimum of 40% of new residential units (phased in with full implementation by 2015) within the existing built-up areas. As a result, in future, the Region will develop a methodology to take into consideration reserving capacity for infill development. Under the current capacity allocation procedure, no servicing capacity is explicitly reserved for lands that are not within a residential plan of subdivision, including lands that have zoning in place that would otherwise allow development to proceed without additional planning approvals. However, intrinsic to the per capita flow are a number of contributing factors above and beyond the simple residential usage. These additional factors include; Inflow and Infiltration (I/I), Industrial Commercial and Institutional (ICI) flows, and flow from developments that are not currently explicitly tracked (site plans). It is assumed that the ratio of residential population to a) employment (equivalent population), and b) non-planning act approvals such as site plans, will remain consistent in each service area from the previous year (2009) to the current year (2010). The available capacity expressed in this report is the capacity available to service all future Planning Act approvals (subdivisions, condominiums, consents, zoning bylaw amendments and minor variances) and/or any building permits issued for development outside of residential plans of subdivision that complies with existing zoning. The current procedure for the allocation of water and wastewater capacity will be revised in future to include all greenfield development and infill development Planning Act approvals. This issue will be examined by Regional and Area Municipal staff and is scheduled to be addressed prior to the 2011 WWWMR report.

    REPORT:

    Water Services produces the annual Water and Wastewater Monitoring Report with input from the Region's Planning, Housing and Community Services (PHCS). The purpose of this report is to:
    1. Document actual water use and wastewater flows;
    2. Provide a basis for water use and wastewater flow forecasts required in preparing the capital budgets and user rates;
    3. Document water production and wastewater treatment capacities;
    4. Update Regional Council with respect to remaining uncommitted capacities of water supply and wastewater treatment infrastructure; and
    5. Provide a basis for engineering staff to provide comment on the water and wastewater aspects of development applications.

    In addition, the 2010 WWWMR report will be one of the inputs used in preparing the 2011 water and wastewater capital budget, longer term water and wastewater capital forecast, and in formulating responses to development applications.

    Main Changes from the 2009 WWWMR
    The main changes from the 2009 WWWMR are as follows:
    • Year-end 2009, population estimates are based on the Province of Ontario’s Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Places to Grow (Nov. 2005) which anticipates a population for the Region of Waterloo of 729,000 in 2031. The population forecast in previous reports which reflected a forecast of 2016 has been extended to the 2021 time horizon for the purposes of this report.
    • The previous WWWMR calculated an average persons per unit (ppu) per service area based on the most current census data, and those ppus were used to determine the remaining units available to be serviced. The average ppu in the Region ranges from 2.55 to 3.15 across the different water and wastewater service areas. The calculation of the average ppu does not account for the variability of unit types. The 2010 WWWMR presents commitments in terms of “people” rather than units to account for the variation in unit types. For evaluating servicing capacity for new development applications, the average ppu for each unit type will be applied to the units in the application to calculate the total number of persons in the proposed development.
    • In an attempt to simplify some of the information in the WWWMR, the summary tables attached have been formatted to reflect the year end 2009 conditions. Reference to the potential future capacities/commitments have been removed from the tables, but are included in the appendices of the 2010 WWWMR.
    • Similarly, reference to Category 1 and 2 commitments have been removed, and all commitments (draft plans, registered units, building permits issued but not yet occupied) are presented simply as “commitments”.
    • In 1996, 4,020 m3/d of the Preston WWTP capacity was held in reserve to service development in the Cambridge Business Park (CBP). Since 1996 that reserve allocation has been reduced to account for development in the CBP. As of the end of 2009, the CBP is assumed to be 100% builtout and therefore no reserve allocation is held for the Cambridge Business Park.
    • At a City of Cambridge Council Meeting on February 8, 2010 a staff report was presented and approved recommending that wastewater allocation be formally reserved for the Boxwood Employment Lands in the Preston Wastewater Service Area as identified in this report. Further analysis is required to accurately estimate the quantity of the reserved allocation. This analysis is ongoing and will be incorporated in the available capacity at the Preston WWTP as it becomes available and will be updated annually in this report.
    • Water consumption patterns and wastewater flows are a function of yearly weather fluctuations. In 2009, the annual precipitation was generally less than the average precipitation levels.

    2010 Water Supply Capacity and Commitments
    Firm or system water supply capacities were adequate to meet actual maximum demands in all communities supplied by a Regional system in 2009. The 10-year and longer forecasts are anticipated to adequately accommodate all current development commitments based upon the implementation of the Region’s current capital program. Table 1, attached, summarizes the remaining water capacity as of December 31, 2009.
    • The Integrated Urban System (IUS) (Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo, Elmira and St. Jacobs water systems) has 52,174 m3/d of remaining capacity, which is equivalent to 126,525 people.
    • The Baden/New Hamburg water system has 6,610 m3/d of remaining capacity, which is equivalent to 17,660 people. The Baden/New Hamburg Master Plan was initiated in 2008 and is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2010.
    • The Ayr water system has 2,590 m3/d of remaining capacity, which is equivalent to 5,224 people.
    • The Wellesley water system has 1,920 m3/d of remaining capacity, which is equivalent to 6,113 people. The St. Clements water system has 1,280 m3/d of remaining capacity, which is equivalent to 3,923 people.

    Small Water Supply Systems
    There are 12 small water supply systems owned and operated by the Region. These systems include: Conestogo (Conestoga Golf Course and Conestoga Plains), Maryhill (Maryhill and Village Heights) and West Montrose in Woolwich; Linwood and Heidelberg (reported as one system including that portion of Heidelberg in Woolwich) in Wellesley; Foxboro Green, New Dundee and St. Agatha in Wilmot; and Roseville and Branchton Meadows in North Dumfries. All numbers reported, excluding actual average and maximum day demand figures, are design numbers based on Ministry of Environment water usage guidelines for small communal water supply systems. Most of these systems were designed to only service specific subdivisions in the respective settlement areas and have no additional capacity to service units beyond those subdivisions. Given the complexity of calculating available capacity for the small systems, available system capacity will be evaluated on an individual basis prior to commenting on development applications. Table 2 summarizes the data on small water systems.

    2010 Wastewater Treatment Capacity and Commitments
    WWTP capacities were sufficient at all Regional plants to treat actual average flows in 2009. The 10-year and longer forecasts are anticipated to adequately accommodate all current development commitments based upon the implementation of the Region’s current capital program. Table 3 summarizes the remaining wastewater capacity as of December 31, 2009.
    The Preston WWTP has a rated capacity of 16,820 m3/d. However, this plant currently receives a high organic content loading from the Industrial Road Service Area (IRSA) that reduced the effective treatment rate to 14,520 m3/d. Beginning in the summer of 2009, the effluent from the IRSA has been gradually diverted from Preston WWTP to Galt WWTP, as recommended in the 2007 Wastewater Master Plan. At year end 2009, the diversion was approximately 50%. By year end 2010, 100% of the effluent is expected to be diverted to Galt. The benefit to Preston WWTP is twofold: the reduction for the organic loading will no longer be required and the actual hydraulic loading to Preston will be reduced. Available capacity for the Preston WWTP in future WWWMRs will be adjusted to reflect the impact of transferring flows from the IRSA to the Galt WWTP.
    In the Baden-New Hamburg Wastewater Service Area, the adjusted measured flow plus the commitments exceed the current rated capacity at the plant. This is largely contributed to a high number of commitments in the service area. It should be noted that the plant currently operates at approximately 75% of the rated capacity. The Baden-New Hamburg Master Servicing Plan is scheduled to be completed in 2010 which will identify the timing for improvements/expansions to the Baden-New Hamburg WWTP. Upon completion of the Master Plan, up to 50% of the expected capacity can be allocated.
    In 1998, the Township of Woolwich and the Region entered into a 10-year agreement to address Inflow and Infiltration (I/I) issues in Elmira and St. Jacobs, which ended on December 31, 2008. The Region will initiate a Wastewater Master Plan in late 2010 to optimize wastewater treatment in these two communities and will work with the Township on alternatives to deal with I/I issues.
    The Region has completed an I/I study for the Village of Wellesley, in the Township of Wellesley in early 2008. This study identified deficiencies in the collection system and makes recommendations for improvements. The Region has completed work to improve the I/I in the Wellesley collection system in 2009. Flow monitoring at the Wellesley WWTP indicates that the repairs generally resulted in a decrease in I/I at the plant. The Region has initiated an update of the I/I study early in 2010. This assignment will confirm the effectiveness of the repairs in the Wellesley collections system, and identify other sources of extraneous flows. The Region will work with the Township to reduce extraneous contributions to the system not directly related to the municipal collection system. Implementation of the Region's wastewater capital program is anticipated to provide adequate wastewater treatment to accommodate all planned development until 2021 and beyond. Therefore, the Region's overall water supply and wastewater treatment commitments are provided for, given the accomplishment of projects now in the Region's capital budgets and longer term capital forecasts.

    Servicing Agreements
    Servicing commitments are made through separate servicing agreements between the Region and the developer, which are executed once a draft approved plan of subdivision or a consent is ready to proceed to registration/final approval. Developers seek an agreement for servicing just prior to registration of the plan of subdivision or final approval. The servicing agreement expires within six to 18 months of being signed, at which time the developer would be required to seek a new commitment for servicing if registration of the plan of subdivision or final approval of the consent has not taken place.
    Since 1996, the time of the registration of a plan of subdivision has traditionally been the point at which the capacity of water and wastewater systems is committed to new subdivisions in accordance with Ministry of the Environment policies. However, since 2004, a significant portion of all residential development has occurred outside of plans of subdivision. This includes development on previously existing lots of record both within the built up areas and within the greenfield areas. These units are typically townhouse or apartment units and are often registered as plans of condominium. This number is expected to increase particularly in the City of Waterloo as there is little remaining designated greenfield area and a large number of applications for site plans and plans of condominiums already in process.
    Section 51 (24) (i) of the Planning Act obliges the Region to ensure the “adequacy of utilities and municipal services.” In addition ROP Policy 5.D.1 states that the “servicing requirements for planned development and projected growth will be monitored to ensure that the total system capacities are not exceeded, and to provide sufficient lead time for the planning, design, approval, financing and construction of new facilities.”
    In 1996, Regional Council by Report PC-96-061/ E-96-138 revised the conditions of draft approval for plans of subdivision to include a new condition requiring an Agreement for Servicing. However, before future, unbuilt service capacity is considered, three criteria must be met:
    1. The capacity expansion project must be imminent for construction and thereby included within the first five years of the 10 Year Capital Forecast;
    2. There must be a sound technical basis for the anticipated new capacity associated with the project, as a result of completion of the Environmental Assessment, a suitable Master Plan or other Regional engineering evaluation; and,
    3. Approval of new draft plans of subdivision will be guided by Area Municipal Staging of Development programs and will not exceed 50% of the estimated capacity of major planned service capacity projects or 75% of minor planned projects.

    It is important to note that the actual service capacity to be delivered from a future project cannot be guaranteed until a Certificate of Approval is issued by the Ministry of the Environment (MOE). The Region is currently undertaking a Wastewater Treatment Master Plan for the New Hamburg/Baden service area. This study will determine the best wastewater treatment alternative to service this community in the long term. As noted previously, this study is expected to be completed in 2010. The Region will also initiate in late 2010 a similar study for the Elmira and St. Jacobs service areas. Funds for the implementation of projects identified in these studies will be included in future Wastewater Capital Programs. The 2010 Wastewater Capital Program already includes funds to ensure adequate future capacity for servicing the Hespeler service area.
    With the adoption of the Places to Grow: Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Municipalities are now required to provide for a minimum of 40% of new residential units (phased in with full implementation by 2015) within the existing built-up areas. As a result, consideration needs to be given to reserving capacity for infill development. Under the current water and wastewater capacity allocation procedure, no servicing capacity is reserved for lands that are not within a residential plan of subdivision, including lands that have zoning in place that would otherwise allow development to proceed without additional planning approvals. The available capacity expressed in this report is the capacity available to service all future Planning Act approvals (subdivisions, condominiums, consents, zoning bylaw amendments and minor variances) and/or any building permits issued for development outside of residential plans of subdivision that complies with existing zoning.
    To address this issue, Regional staff will undertake research over 2010 and will consult with the Area Municipalities and the development industry to develop a potential revised servicing allocation procedure for the allocation of water and wastewater capacity in 2010 to guide the preparation of the 2011 WWWMR.





  18. #17
    The Ontario Environmental Commissioner Gord Miller has released his annual report Sept. 22nd which covers his feedback regarding the Environmental Bill of Rights Request for Review regarding requests for a Waterloo Moraine and Galt Paris Moraine Act.

    The entire report and report summery can be reviewed online here: http://www.eco.on.ca/eng/

    Here is a breakdown of the key points made:

    -Population growth may be appropriate where there is adequate access to water supplies. However, the long-term supply of potable water will be adversely affected by increased development and demand for water.

    -MNR Models predict that by mid-century Southern Ontario will experience at least and average 2.5 degree Celsius warming in the summer with consequent increased evapotranspiration.

    -The region expects to spend $826 million in the next 10 years in treatment upgrades and expansions to water and wastewater treatment.

    -The City of Guelph Water Supply Master Plan indicates the need for additional ground and/or surface water supplies by 2017-2025.

    -Cambridge is examining the option of bedrock wells to meet it's water demands.

    -The report (MOE review) found the Region of Waterloo has been pro-active in water resource protection and has developed and extensive monitoring program and sub-watershed development plans. Nevertheless, no specific land-use controls have been proposed.

    -Although not officially part of the review the (MOE) report found that the Clean Water Act, the PPS, the Greenbelt Plan and the Ontario Water Resources Act provide adequate protection for groundwater recharge in the upper Grand River Watersheds and other watersheds.

    -MOE revealed that additional studies examining water supplies were being conducted and were expected to be completed in 2010. The report also stressed the continued need to analyze data and monitor and assess future growth implications.

    -MOE committed to developing guidance materials to assist with the implementation of policies protecting hydrologic functions of the moraine.

    ECO COMMENTS

    -If the principles of watershed-based planning are applied, and the environmental and socio-economic context of the moraines are examined to assess the cumulative effects of development, the ECO believes that the current provincial policies do not adequately protect the ecological and hydrogeological integrity of moraines.

    -In our 2006-2007 Annual Report, which examined the challenges to creating sustainable communities in southern Ontario, the ECO found that "serious conflicts are inherent in the province's plans for balancing growth and ecosystem sustainability."

    -The mandated use of a system-based approach - in contrast to the voluntary nature of the PPS - should ideally require the explicit prioritization of the ecological and hydrological integrity in land use planning. For example, watersheds should be a key unit within land use planning in which to frame decision-making.

    -Ecologically sustainable water management requires the protection of the integrity and resilience of the affected ecosystems while meeting the human needs for water.

    -It (the MOE report) did not assess whether the ecological capacity of the moraines can realistically accommodate the projected growth in the region.

    -interestingly, several models cited by the report indicate that the water capacity of the moraine's recharge areas decreased as the population increased.

    -The population projections for Growth Plan communities were established before the future water and wastewater infrastructure was identified, and their associated costs and environment impacts, were assessed. This clearly indicates that provincial policies, such as the Growth Plan, favor economic development over sustainable planning processes.

    - Not only does the Growth Plan fail to require that population allocations be adjusted for communities with watersheds close to or already at carrying capacity, it favors large-scale infrastructure projects to overcome natural limits. Waterloo is proposing to address any future water shortages by constructing a pipe to Lake Erie to pump water in and out of the city. Not only do infrastructure projects like these override natural ecological carrying capacity, they are also extremely costly and energy intensive, and as a sewage and water systems, ("infrastructure") they are exempt from natural heritage protections in the PPS and Greenbelt Plan despite their potential for significant environmental effects.

    -It is unlikely that every jurisdiction or level of government will have the same priorities. The resulting piecemeal approach to planning and protection can leave ecologically and hydrogeologically significant areas vulnerable or under protected, thereby compromising the entire landscape and the communities that rely on it.

    -A comprehensive system-based plan for natural heritage protection, as well as land use planning is clearly required to address such problems.

    -Our past reviews reveal that they (Provincial planning laws) were ineffective in preventing, curtailing or modifying environmentally destructive developments.

    -Natural features such as large moraines should be the very basis at the outset, on which local land use planning decisions are weighed. Yet the province does not specifically identify moraines as a landform or natural heritage feature to be considered for protection.

    -On numerous occasions the MOE has asserted that it's planning system is adequate to protect significant environmental features. The ECO finds this assertion unconvincing given that the government has had to create several individual laws and policies to protect specific vulnerable ecosystems including the Oak Ridges Moraine, the Protected Country Side and Lake Simcoe. The province should acknowledge, as it did for the Oak Ridges Moraine, that these laws and policies on their own are inadequate to protect complex ecological features spanning several jurisdictions.

    -The province has the opportunity to make a strong commitment to ecosystems-based planning in Ontario. The PPS is under review.

    -MMAH should revise the PPS to require that diversity and connectivity of natural features, as well as their long-term ecological function, and biodiversity, be maintained and restored. This would improve planning in Ontario and help to ensure significant natural features are protected.

    RECOMMENDATION 14- The ECO recommends that the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing amend the Provincial Policy Statement to require that long term ecological function and biodiversity of natural heritage systems are maintained.
  19. Waterlooer's Avatar
    From Waterloo, ON | Member Since Apr 2010 | 853 Posts
    #18

    Kitchener/Waterloo Water Tower

    I couldn't find this information anywhere else on the forums and don't know if this is the right place to post this so you might have to move it. I have noticed the K/W water tower by Sportsworld has lots of metal poles all around it. I was wondering if anyone knows if it is being expanded or if it's something not too important etc.
  20. Urbanomicon's Avatar
    From Kitchener, Ontario | Member Since Feb 2010 | 981 Posts
    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Waterlooer
    I couldn't find this information anywhere else on the forums and don't know if this is the right place to post this so you might have to move it. I have noticed the K/W water tower by Sportsworld has lots of metal poles all around it. I was wondering if anyone knows if it is being expanded or if it's something not too important etc.
    It is being repainted I believe.
    "Only the insane have the strength enough to prosper. Only those that prosper may truly judge what is sane."
  21. #20
    Last Friday's (Oct. 22) Record mentioned it was undergoing some refurbishing.
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